Making choices often and early


improvisation_photo

Steal the Show with Michael Port:

Be the kind of person so others are willing to help you. Choose early and often. 
Strong ability to improvise, it will help us to stay longer in the moment. Instead of thinking about what to say next or what to say something about that we already said.
The choices we make signal the other people who we are and what we believe in. If we do not make choices that are strong, we do not produce much. If we make choices that are weak-easy, we revile low image of our self. If we do not make any choices at all, nothing will happen. If we make choices often and early, it gets us further and quicker.

It seems like overcoming resistance is a step toward the strong choice. Less is better but is it strong? Exploring the “stronger” choices takes readiness and previsualization. They are resources for improvisation-stay longer in the moment.

Stand Out — Dorie Clark:

“To bring idea to live you do not necessary need time, you need space for it”
You will never go where you want to get by attacking the target directly. You almost always need to go sideways to build your brand sufficiently. So they hear of you and they will come to you.
Play your strength. If it takes you to write a blog 25 hours, do it video.

So, be the kind of person that others are willing to help. Make yourself useful for others.


Thoughts from two interviews of Unmistakable Creative: “Steal the Show” with Michael Port and Accidental Creative: Dorie Clark on “Stand Out”

  1. RMAU
    Making direct suggestions may help the hesitant child to make a choice. Children whose parents make decisions for them may be overwhelmed by a situation in which they are now expected to choose for themselves. They need time, support, and practice as well as patient teachers to help them learn this skill.
  2. WomensNews
    As adults, we manage making the right choices, often because our parents and elders have stepped in to help us make the right one. What then is our role as parents? How do we teach our children, of a generation that is obsessed with technology and blasted with information, to discern the right from wrong? Here's how.